Third Meeting: Monday, 14 Nov. 2016: Fiction, Psychotherapy and Narrative Medicine

Next Meeting

Date and time: Monday, 14 Nov. 2016, 7 pm
Venue: Paradise Palms, 41 Lothian Street. (Across the street from Bristo Square)
Reading: On the theme of ‘fiction, psychoanalysis and narrative medicine’:
1) Coetzee, J.M. and Arabella Kurtz. The Good Story: Exchanges on Truth, Fiction and Psychotherapy. Lodnon: Harvill Secker, 2015. (Excerpts: Chapters 1, 2, 5 and 6)
2) Coetzee, J.M. and Arabella Kurtz. ‘Nevertheless, My Sympathies are with the Karamazovs.’ Salmagundi nos.166-7. (Spring-Summer 2010): 39-72.
3) Holmes, Jeremy. ‘Narrative in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy: the Evidence?’ Medical Humanities 26.2 (Dec. 2000): 92-6.
4) Charon, Rita. Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2006. (Excerpts: Chapters 4 and 6).

I should like to start with my apologies for the confusion at the last meeting regarding the venue. I had not realised that Teviot was going to be closed for the House of Horrors. We waited outside for the first few minutes to catch everyone who was attending, and then we moved to Paradise Palms. However, I realise we may still have missed some of you who attended. In the future, I shall try to make sure the venues are available. (On this subject, it would appear Teviot is going to be exceedingly busy next fortnight for EUSA’s Give it a Go Week, so we might want to meet at Paradise Palms straight away.)

Other than that, thank you to everybody who came to the last meeting. It was another riveting discussion (and, I confess, the session on Larkin was one I had been wanting to run for quite some time now). If any of you would like to attend in the future, feel free.


A few quick housekeeping notes: in terms of how we send out notice for future meetings, it would appear that most of the regular members in attendance have preferred email rather than social media or the blog. While I do appreciate the flexibility of the Facebook group in allowing members to post links and recommendations directly, and I also value the archival nature of the blog, I’m concerned that a lot of the effort spent in managing multiple platforms might be misdirected (especially since we do not seem to be getting any increase in activity because of either the blog or Facebook). Also, because of copyright regulations governing the reproduction of material for academic purposes, it is best we circulate copies of our readings in a closed ecosystem via email rather than by uploading them to Facebook or the Internet. I think it would be worth thinking about how we organise the group, and considering whether or not we migrate to a mailing list entirely. I would appreciate it if I could get any further feedback and/or suggestions from members regarding this.

Secondly, I have received complaints that members on our mailing list are not receiving emails. This could be caused by a number of factors: Spam/Clutter folders, message filters, MailChimp server blacklists, et cetera. Could I just ask all our members to

  1. tell me if they are not receiving these notices (how ironic);
  2. check their Spam/Clutter folders;
  3. check for any existing mail filters that might be blocking these emails;
  4. adding this email address to their contacts

I am hoping this solves the problem. If it does not, I might try migrating our mailing list to a different platform.

Finally, no notice would be complete without a mention of time and day. It would appear Mondays at 7 pm is the time when the highest numbers can attend, and fortnightly meetings seems to be the best interval. However, if any member would like to propose a change of time, feel free to do so and we can consider rescheduling meetings. For the next meeting, we should meet at Paradise Palms because Teviot will be busy with EUSA’s Give it a Go Week events.


After the forthcoming meeting, I would have proposed readings for three consecutive meetings, which for the group is quite repetitive and personally is a little exhausting as far as photocopying and preparation are concerned. So I would like to urge members to think about themes or texts we can read in the future so that we can have other suggestions for subsequent meetings.


Next, for the readings for the forthcoming session, I would like to propose we continue our discussion of narrativity in medicine by focussing on the intersection between (psychoanalytic) psychotherapy and literary fiction, looking particular at a series of correspondences and dialogues between the novelist J.M. Coetzee and the psychoanalyst and psychotherapist Arabella Kurtz.

So please read either one (or both if you have the time) of the following:
1) Coetzee, J.M. and Arabella Kurtz. The Good Story: Exchanges on Truth, Fiction and Psychotherapy. Lodnon: Harvill Secker, 2015. (Excerpts: Chapters 1, 2, 5 and 6)
2) Coetzee, J.M. and Arabella Kurtz. ‘Nevertheless, My Sympathies are with the Karamazovs.’ Salmagundi nos.166-7. (Spring-Summer 2010): 39-72.

And please also read:
3) Holmes, Jeremy. ‘Narrative in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy: the Evidence?’ Medical Humanities 26.2 (Dec. 2000): 92-6.

The following is purely optional for background alone, although do read it if you want to consider the questions we will discuss from the meeting in a much larger context within narrative medicine.
4) Charon, Rita. Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2006. (Excerpts: Chapters 4 and 6).

(If you need help finding the material, please contact me via email.)


Finally, if you have any questions about the Reading Group, any suggestions for things to read or would like to know more, feel free to get in touch via email. You can also find us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/315485175143288/).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s